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Italian Instrument Style -Transcription for violin and organ

Artists
Lina Uinskyte, violin
Marco Ruggeri, organ
Composers
Antonio Veretti (1900-1978)
Amilcare Ponchielli (1834-1886)
Antonio Bazzini (1818-1897)
Nino Rota (1911-1979)
Mario Pilati (1903-1938)
Organ
Pietro Bernasconi (1892)
Venue
Chiesa della Confraternita di San Bernardino, Vercelli, Italy

About this album

Among the most active Italian music player of the nineteenth century with no doubt it is to remember Antonio Veretti (Verona, 1900 / Roma, 1978). Graduated in composition in Bologna at only 21 years old, student of Mattioli and Alfano, he began a brilliant career as a teacher that brought him to the direction of the conservatories of Pesaro, Cagliari and Firenze. The background of Bologna takes him in touch with Riccardo Bacchelli and the “Ronda” literary movement: on a Bacchelli’s work he writes his first composition Il medico volante (1923-24). Then he moved to Milano and after that to Roma. His huge production inserts himself in the footsteps of Pizzetti and Casella, but it has many evolutions until the twelve-tone music of the 50’s. He is the author of many instrumental music works, such as symphonies, concerts and chamber music. Duo strumentale (1955), originally written for violin and piano, has a neoclassical, elegant and brilliant language in which the bound with the past is clear in the striking homage to Corelli ( 2nd part) and in the adoption of proper forms of the traditional instrumental music (Rondò of the 3rd part). Famous for his activity as an opera composer, Amilcare Ponchielli (Pader­no Ponchielli, 1834 – Milano, 1886) was actually very prolific also in instrumental music and in particular the band one. Capriccio per oboe e pianoforte was composed for a friend and a colleague like Cesare Confalonieri, student of oboe at the conservatory of Milano, when Ponchielli studied composition, then became teacher of oboe at the same institute. The autograph (at Archivio Ricordi), an handwritten copy (at Museo Civico di Cremona) and the Ricordi posthumous edition of this work of 1889 are kept safe. In the manuscript the reported title is Gran Capriccio, in confirmation of the wide proportions and most of all of the formal well-constructed structure, with a range of characters, thematic revivals and the brilliant theme with final variations. The passionate and virtuoso writing of the oboe makes acceptable and convincing also the violin. Extraordinary person, among the Italian opera composers, was that of Antonio Bazzini (Brescia, 1818 – Milano, 1897). Violin player of European fame, he studied composition in Leipzig from 1843 to 1848 in the circle of Schumann and Mendelssohn. The same Schumann praised his merits of violin player in 1843: «As a performer, Bazzini surely belongs to the larger of the present. I don’t know anyone good as him at technique, at grace and at fullness of sound, and most of all at pureness and equality. Besides he prevails the others especially in freshness, youth and in severity» (from Neue Zeitschrift fur Musik). With the author at the piano, he had instead the privilege of playing Concerto per violino by Mendelssohn in a private performance. Strong of those experiences, his return in his homeland was the occasion to spread the interest for instrumental music in opposition to the triumphal opera. On the contrary someone saw him as the anti-Verdi, promoter of new ideas and repertoires. He wrote chamber music and for orchestra with particular attention to the violin. For those merits he was charged of teaching composition at the conservatory of Milano in 1873, institute of which he was director from 1882. Concerto militare, name given to Concerto per violino e orchestra n. 5, dates back to 1863 and it was dedicated to the King Vittorio Emanuele II. The brilliant violin writing links itself with the strength of the instrumental part, that it is not only a simple accompaniment, but it is an integral part of the instrumental set. The military character of the two extreme movements contrasts with Preghiera centrale with an intense, melodic and nostalgic character. Nino Rota (Milano, 1911 – Roma, 1979) has lived during the twentieth century, but for many reasons he is bounded to the previous one. Enfant prodige, he graduated in composition with Casella at just 19 years old, after debuting as a composer at just 11 years old with the oratory L’infanzia di San Giovanni Battista (1922), while in 1926 he wrote Il Principe Porcaro, a work for children by an Andersen’s fairy tale. But Rota is famous most of all for his numerous soundtracks, some of which awarded with international prizes. He worked also as an author of chamber music, for orchestra, for sacred and theatre music. Improvviso per violino e pianoforte here performed is a composition based on the main theme of the soundtrack D’amanti senza amore (1947). The programme finishes with Preludio, Aria e Tarantella by Mario Pilati (Napoli, 1903 – 1938), student of Antonio Savasta at the conservatory of Napoli. Composer of precocious talent, he won many awards in prestigious competitions and also professorships at various conservatories in Italy. First in Cagliari, from 1930 in the same Napoli. In the meantime, on the advice of Ildebrando Pizzetti, he moved to Milano, where he worked for Casa Ricordi in many ways. Although his short life, his production is huge, most of all for chamber music. He wrote also Concerto per orchestra, Suite per pianoforte e orchestra and an unfinished opera, Piedigrotta. Pilati stylistically was influ­en­ced by Pizzetti, but he reveals since the beginning a strong personality and an elegant talent. During the last years of his young life he was interested in popular themes of Napoli, of which Preludio, Aria and Tarantella are an adult and effective example: the quotes flow and contribute to the general unity of the work. The opening theme of Preludio, for example, returns at the end of Tarantella, brilliantly introduced by the vivid proceeding of the dance. Always in Preludio appears the O sole mio theme, at the piano, expertly hidden by the violin scales and by the harmony colours. The organ transcription of pieces first conceived for violin and orchestra or piano comes from the aim of underline the orchestral features of the organ. In particular we played a great Italian instrument of the late nineteenth century, built by Pietro Bernasconi in 1892 for the church of San Bernardino in Vercelli. This organ is in between the nineteenth century tradition of the “orchestra” organ and the next “symphonic” developments of the twentieth century organ: it has expressive sounds, impetuous reeds and ripieno. The performance at the organ of the piano and orchestra parts has necessarily entailed some adaptations. However the brief section of the organ keyboards compared to the piano is partly rewarded by the huge keyboard basses that gives a real whole depth like an orchestra. The expressive sweetness of the work, the flutes and reeds cantabile, the power of basses and bombards, the power of ripieno, all this united to the three sounding levels at the same time (two pedal keyboards and one keyboard), have made possible a challenging job of organ adaptation of the orchestra part. Marco Ruggeri

J.S. Bach. Transcriptions for saxophone and organ

Artists
Pietro Tagliaferri, sassofono soprano
Stefano Pellini, organo
Composer
Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) 
Organ
Dell’Orto & Lanzini (2007)
Venue
Chiesa Parrocchiale di Santa Maria Assunta,
Vigliano Biellese, Italy

About this album

Since the 19th century Bach’s music has been source for endless interpretations, transcriptions and adaptations: Bach’s perfect proportions and counterpoints have been played trough years on all kinds of instruments. The project “Riverberi” is giving his particular contribution on this compact disc, exploring Bach’s repertoire from an unusual point of view: the sax soprano (an instrument that Bach couldn’t know because invented later on) . If it’s true that Bach’s scores had been transcribed countless times is also true that within these scores we count a lot of transcriptions made by Bach himself. In particular he loved Vivaldi so much that he transcribed for keyboards his concerts in order to make this hugely popular music playable by a single performer. In the opener on this CD, the F major concert BWV 978, the orchestral part is given to the organ while the sax reproduces the former violin solo parts. In the choral prelude “Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme” BWV 645 the choral part is played in the organ trumpet register while the saxophone embellish with the utterly beautiful melody that symbolise brides’ walk waiting for their husbands according to St Mathew’s gospel. A signifying anthology about Goldberg’s variations BWV 988 allows the players to shed a light on melodies otherwise hidden in the original scores. Also the aria for contralto with oboe “Qui Sedes” offers a contrast between the two instruments: besides opening and closing the performance the oboe/sax plays with the contralto/solo register of the organ creating interesting textures. No other ways of composing value the contrast between voices as the Bach’s widely used form “trio”. On top of that the key of the first trio sonata is E major flat, which in Vigliano’s pipe-organ Lanzini-Dall’Orto assumes a peculiar character, sometime harsh, sometime shiny. In the bright opening sax and organ exchange themes and melodies, the following movement is a dialog between reed instruments, the sax on one side and the organ Dulzian register from the other. Lastly the two instruments seem to chase each others creating a nice circular effect. The simple descending melody that opens the ‘Largo ma non tanto’ concert BWV 1043 is here played from the organ, suddenly echoed by the sax/first violin in a such refined rhyme that can be easily mentioned as on of the finest pages from Bach’s production. In the aria for soprano “Mein Glaübiges Herze” the playful theme played by the saxophone is counterpointed from two bass lines, in particular from the opposing melody performed by the violoncello piccolo (organ reed); in the unusually long final coda the oboe line is assigned to the sax and one more voice is added to the already rich polyphony: here the dialogue became admirable producing a really intriguing and effective outcome. The Symphonic Inventions are well known pages also because compulsory steps on the educational path of each keyboard player. Listen back to B minor Symphony n.7 BWV 793 on this instrumental arrangement value the movement of single voices, assigned to three different sources of sounds (first keyboard organ pipes in a higher and central position, the saxophone in a central position, and the body of the second keyboard , the Rückpositiv, placed in a lower position, closer to the listener). If the toccata and fugue in D minor highlights the shiny and full sound of Vigliano Biellese’s pipe-organ. The famous Choral form Cantata BWV 147 offers again Riverberi’s signature sound with a persistent movement of triplets. The record closes with the delicate and lyrical “Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier” were the human invocation to god (beloved Jesus we are here) finds place in the round sound of saxophone, with precious embellishments from the organ Cornetto register.

Belle Epoque à Turin. Organ pieces from 1884 Exibition

Artist
Roberto Cognazzo, organ
Composers
Alfredo Catalani (1854-1893) 
Franco Faccio (1840-1891)
Charles Gounod (1818-1893) 
Romualdo Marenco (1841-1907)
Jules Massenet (1842-1912) 
Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791-1864) 
Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921) 
Richard Wagner (1813-1883)
Giuseppe Verdi (1813-1901)
Organ
Carlo Vegezzi Bossi (1858-1927)
Venue
Chiesa di San Massimo Vescovo, Torino, Italy

About this album

Within the universal exhibition held in Turin in 1884 music didn't play a secondary role. The exhibition had a dedicated space where the best pianos and pipe-organs crafters were hosting spectacular music performances. In that occasion the golden medal for organs crafter was appointed to Carlo Vegezzi-Bossi ( 1858-1927) who featured a magnificent instrument highlighting the melodramatic type with hints of French taste. After the exhibition the organ was moved to San Massimo church in Turin, which at the time didn't own one yet. The instrument was fully restored in 2014 from Brondino-Vegezzi Bossi's firm and with this CD inaugurates its second life. The musical content consists in his entirety by transcription elaborated by pipe-organ master Roberto Cognazzo and recalls what it used to be heard during the 1884 musical season. The results vary from brushing paradox (Gounod, Marenco, Saint-Saens) to triumphalism (Meyerbeer, Wagner) to a genuinely crepuscular taste (Massenet, Catalani). Lastly, a hidden gem almost forgotten during the centuries, the moving Ofelia's funeral march from Shakespeare's Hamlet, this was the second and last composition by Faccio.

German Romantic Composers. Organ pieces

Artist
Marco Limone, organo
Composers
Felix Mendelsshon-Bartoldy (1809-1847)
Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)
Robert Schuman (1810-1856),
Joseph Gabriel Rheinberger (1839-1901) 
Sigfrid Karg-Elert (1877-1903)
Max Reger (1873-1916)
Organ
Carlo Vegezzi Bossi (1914)
Venue
Basilica del Corpus Domini, Turin, Italy

Information Album

This CD opens with Mendelessohn's (1809-1847) prelude and fuga in C minor Op. 37. The severity in the fuga reveals the solid counterpoints skills owned who managed to bring back to apogee J.S. Bach's music. This is forerun by emphasised violins hints within the moving prelude. The fervent farewell to J. Brahms's (1833-1897) life and music is here portrayed from well-known 'preludio al corale' 'Herzlich tut mich verlangen' N.10, from choral preludes 122, written in the very last years of Hamburg composer's life. Shuman's “Symphony Sketches” (1810-1856) draw inspiration from the “piano with foot pedals” instrument used to practice by pipeorgans players at thath time. The pleasant results of these preconditions descend clearly from piano frameworks, which find complete fulfilment in the "king of musical instruments", great variety of tones and textures. Liechtenstein born Josef Gabriel Rheinberger (1839-1901) was a highly prolific composer. Nowadays he is remembered mostly for his remarkable pipe-organ works and in particular for his twenty “Sonate”. From the 11th sonata is drawn the mellow Cantilène, sweet melody entrusted to oboe tones. Sigfrid Karg-Elert (1877-1933) was active both as performer and teacher and he developed a well pronounced impressionist musical style. His appellative “pipe-organ Debussy” hail from his music seductive shades and courageous modulations. The powerful and triumphal march “Nun danket alle Gott” op. 65 is one of his most famous and well achieved compositions. The conclusion of this collection, consecrated to German Romanticism, couldn't miss to homage the great Max Reger (1873-1916) here represented from the sinuous and stunning Melodia op.59 N. 11 and from the powerful Improvisation from Sonata opera 60 in D minor.

The best organ works

Artists
Giovanna Franzoni, organ
Elena Gentiletti Drago, organ
Composers
Giovanni Morandi (1777-1856)
Organs
G. Callido (1776); G. Callido (1784)
N. Morettini (1898)
Venues
Chiesa di San Lorenzo Martire,
Cerasa, San Costanzo (PU)
Chiesa di Sant’Agostino (PU)
Chiesa di San Michele Arcangelo, Rosora, (AN)

About this album

Giovanni Morandi è forse il compositore italiano per organo più significativo nel periodo tra Frescobaldi e Marco Enrico Bossi. L’immagine tramandata di lui è quella di un musicista influenzato dall’opera: ciò è vero solo in parte, e del resto nell’Ottocento qualunque musica strumentale risentiva degli influssi dell’opera. Partendo da questa visione ormai superata si è dato avvio ad un progetto che ha visto associati ricerca musicologica e performance, che ha riscoperto i lavori giovanili e quelli meno noti e più originali della maturità in modo da offrire un’immagine più ricca e veritiera di questo compositore. I collegamenti con la musica operistica del tempo sono evidenti, come si era accennato, ma rischiano di diventare un topos che impedisce una conoscenza più approfondita del suo catalogo. All’opera rimandano citazioni vere e proprie, una sorta di omaggio realizzato attraverso motivi cui viene poi dato sviluppo autonomo: nella Pastorale a quattro mani si noterà come il tema d’apertura richiami il Quintetto dal primo atto della Semiramide di Rossini. Numerosi pezzi riprendono lo schema costruttivo della Sinfonia rossiniana: si aprono con una introduzione lenta (caratterizzata da incisi contrastanti dall’effetto teatrale) alla quale succede una sezione veloce.

Debussy à l’orgue, aux allures doucement effacées

Artist
Paolo Bottini, organo
Composer
Claude Debussy (1862-1918)
Organ
Anneessens Ruyssers (1908)
Venue
Chiesa di San Gioacchino ai Prati, Roma, Italy

About this album

Debussy non scrisse mai opere per organo, eppure non è questa la prima volta che sorge l’idea di rivisitare sue creature su questo “re degli strumenti”, dalla sonorità piena e sostenuta, ma versatile nei coloriti e capace di delicate trasparenze. In questo compito si erano già cimentati i suoi contemporanei Alexandre Guilmant (1837-1911), Léon Roques (18391923) e Gaston Choisnel (1857-1921). Ora Paolo Bottini attinge ad alcune delle loro trascrizioni, ma aggiunge di suo trasposizioni sull’organo di pagine pianistiche lette direttamente dagli originali: nuove preziose perle per questa sorprendente collana. Nel caso dei Deux Arabesques che aprono la serie, è appunto Paolo Bottini a dare una propria veste organistica agli originali per pianoforte, destinati a un esecutore singolo. Questi vennero scritti separatamente uno dall’altro nel 1888 e nel 1891, per poi venire organizzati in suite nell’edizione Durand del 1891. Children’s corner (Angolo dei bimbi) è una raccolta di sei pezzi per pianoforte composta fra il 1906 e il 1908, che sottolinea un momento particolare della vita di Debussy: l’affacciarsi alla vita della piccola Claude-Emma, nata il 30 ottobre 1905 dalla sua relazione con Emma Bardac, più tardi divenuta la sua seconda moglie. 

Additional info about this CD 
Recorded in Rome, Italia, nel 2017 
20 pages full colour booklet (Ita and Eng) 
Musicology comment, 
Full organ specs card included

L'office divin-Pièces pour harmonium ou orgue

Composer
Filippo Capocci (1840-1911)
Organs
G. Mola (1894) Chiesa di San Pietro in Vincoli, Lanzo Torinese, Turin, Italy
Harmonium, Rodolphe Fils & Debain(1900), Chiesa di Santa Anastasia, Monastero di Lanzo, Turin, Italy

About this album

Filippo Capocci was born in Rome the 11th of may 1840, son of a pipe-organ player employed at the Arcibasilica of Giovanni di Laterano in Rome. He was soon encouraged by his father to study music and in 1861 he gained a diploma in pipe-organ at Santa Cecilia's academy in Rome. His career as a performer brought him to travel around all Italy and Europe, meeting everywhere the great approval of his audience. After a triumphal concert at Santa Cecilia's academy in Rome he was selected from Queen Margherita of Savoia as her personal organ tutor. Office Divin draws inspiration explicitly from the compositions of the French tradition, devised both for pipe-organ and harmonium but more frequently with an eye of regard for this last one.

Organ works

Artist
Walter Gatti, organo
Composer
Dieterich Buxtehude  (1637-1707)
Organ
Dell’Orto & Lanzini (2011)
Venue
Chiesa della Madonna di Fatima 
Pinerolo, Turin, Italy

About this album

Denmark composer and organist Dietreich Buxtehude (1637-1707) was a man of broad culture (his hometown Latin school was one of the most prestigious of his times and he came from an highly educated family). Generous and beloved from acquaintances both in his homeland and abroad, Buxtehude lived in several cities in Germany before settle down permanently in Lubecca, where he became extremely popular. His astonishing musical style is mixing bravery and consistency in an alternation between sharp architectures and oasis of peacefulness. Today his style might be seen as tragic, elusive almost barbaric. This is particularly true for his pipe-organ productions, also thanks to his direct experience in crafting organs. In truth Buxtehude’s music is a clear portrait of his times, connecting Sweelinck’s Dutch style with Weckmann’s Italian taste. Buxtehude made use of these different languages with a smart and independent attitude, is the so called ‘Stylus Phantasticus’ or in other words a way of composing well theorised at the time that prescribes not to stick to any particular rule with the only intention of raising emotional participation in the listeners. What makes great Buxtehude’s productions is the extraordinary control on such a wide diversity of sonic materials. The illusory impression of ‘disorder’ and magmatic extroversion in his music is nothing else than a pradoxical but conscious way of expression. 

Additional info about this CD
Recorded in Pinerolo, Italy, 2013
16 pages full colour booklet (Ita and Eng)
Musicology comment
Artist biography
Full organ specs card included.

Christmas music for children choir

Artists
Corrado Cavalli, organo
Federica Mancini, arpa
Artemusica, coro voci bianche
Debora Bria, direttore
Composers
Benjamin Britten (1913-1976), 
John Rutter (1945), 
David Willcocks (1919-2015)
Organs
Angelo Nava (1902); Italo Marzi (1996)
Venue
Chiesa della Natività di Maria Vergine
Piobesi Torinese, Torino, Italy
Chiesa di San Pietro in Vincoli,
Castagnole Piemonte, Turin, Italy

About this album

Born within the early middle-age liturgical environment, the white vocals choir will remain for a long time in the most important European musical centres. His peculiarity had always been not to distinguish between the pedagogical and the musical aspects. It’s well known that often was choir director’s responsibility to provide education and sustenance to his pupils. The great tradition of the cantor child within England’s cathedrals formed few of the greatest composers of their times as they begin their apprenticeship as singers in white vocals choirs. Names like W. Byrd, member of royal chapel for 5 years, O. Gibbons, C. Tye, P. Phillips, cantors of St. Paul’s cathedral in London. After Puritans decline cathedrals choirs re--‐flourished in 1660 with Charles the 2nd restoration and peaked with Purcell and Handel. This tradition is still alive nowadays and as happened at the time lots of great composer now still move their first steps into music trough white vocals choirs, following the example of Orlando di Lasso, J. S. Bach, J. Haydn. The unique timbre of white vocals has surely seduced the imagination of lots of 20th century composers. It’s not anymore a mere substitution of female vocals but the use of an instrument with different timbre and dynamics. Musicians as the eclectic Benjamin Britten consecrated to them well-know pages as the Ceremony of Carols, another homage to the English culture, till the majestic War Requiem, witnessing a tradition that trough the centuries never lost prestige and cultural value.

Additional info about this CD
Recorded in Piobesi Torinese and in Castagnole Piemonte, Italy, 2013
40 pages full colour booklet
Musicology comment
Artist biography

Organ music in the time of Padre Davide

Artist
Marco Ruggeri, organ
Composers
Wolfang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
Franz Jpseph Haydn (1732-1809) 
Niccolò Paganini (1782-1840) 
Johann George Albrechtsberger (1736-1809) 
Giuseppe Nicolini (1762-1842)
Giovanni Pacini (1796-1867) 
Nicola Vaccaj (1790-1840) 
Johann Simon Mayr (1763-1845) 
Giacomo Meyerbeer (1791-1864) 
Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868)
Organ
Fratelli Serassi (1825-1838)
Venue
Basilica di Santa Maria di Campagna, Piacenza - Italy

About this album

The programme chosen for this recording is completely taken from printed edition and manuscripts kept in Music Archives of Santa Maria di Campagna, Piacenza. That Fondo was almost totally created by Padre Davide that did his priesthood and, at the same time, was organ player and kappelmeister in Piacenza from 1818 to 1863. So the pieces recorded here were well known to the friar from Bergamo and indeed were a brief but significant part of his music culture and his keyboard repertoire. We do not know exactly what models – manuscripts and printed – were really acquired by the friar for his music library. In fact there was also one of his brother and pupil – friar Leone from Codogno (1809-1894) – who was very active, not in the compositional activity, but most of all in the transcription of music works. Thanks to friar Leone, for example, many works by Padre Davide, that otherwise would be lost, reached us.Many autographs by Padre Davide were taken from the Archives or lost without control. However a great quantity of material contained nowadays in the Fondo was certainly known – if not directly acquired – by Padre Davide himself, in particular the most ancient models dated back to the first nineteenth century.

Organ works

Artists
Gianluca Cagnani, organo
Giulia Musuruane, cantus
Composer
Jan Pieterzoon Sweelinck (1562-1621)
Organ
Dell’Orto & Lanzini (2011)
Venue
Chiesa di Nostra Signora di Fatima,
Pinerolo, Torino, Italy

Information ALBUM

VenueChiesa di Nostra Signora di Fatima, Pinerolo, Torino, Italy Was a Dutch composer, organist and pedagogue who produced in between the end of renaissance and beginning of Baroque era. He was among the greatest European keyboard composers and his work as music teacher helped to spread German organ tradition all over the continent. Sweelinck probably spent all his life in Amsterdam and left his city just occasionally for work duties. His fame as composer grew constantly over all his life. Was called “Amsterdam’s Orpheus” by his contemporaries and even local authorities brought important visitors to his improvisations. This CD is meant to offer the widest panoramic possible on Sweelnick’s works. His works can be divided in three macro groups: 1. Free compositions (Toccate, Preambula, Fantasie); 2. Works on holy Leider (mainly choirs and psalms); 3. Variations on secular Leider. Composition of groups 1 and 3 are playable both on organ and harpsichord apart few cases where is explicitly required to use the pedal. While choirs and psalms are consecrated exclusively to the organ for obvious liturgical matters but also to enhance the ‘cantus firmus’ with the help of the pedal. This track--‐list allows the experience of many musical forms and to enjoy the richness of timbres required for these compositions.

Additional info about this CD
Recorded in Pinerolo, Italy, 2012
28 pages full colour booklet (Ita and Eng)
Musicology comment
Artist biography
Full organ specs card included

Fiori Musicali

Artist
Luca Guglielmi, organo
Composer
Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583-1643)
Organs
C.Catarinozzi (1695?); F.M. e G.B. Concone (1752?);
G.F. Landesio (metà XVIII sec.)
Venue
Chiesa Abbaziale dei Santi Pietro e Andrea,
Novalesa, Torino, Italia
Chiesa di San Genesio Martire,
Corio, Torino, Italy
Chiesa di San Verano,
Pinerolo, Torino, Italy

Information Album

One of the most relevant collections on Frescobaldi’s works, with Sunday mass, Apostles’ mass and Virgin Mary’s mass recorded on three historical pipe-organs among the oldest within Turin’s region. The musical flowers are nowadays considered as the best work of Frescobaldi, in a certain way the successful completion to his career as a composer. In truth their release in 1635 is surrounded by several other masterpieces appeared almost in the same period. In the same year a fully renewed version of instrumental songs of 1628 and in 1637 the last reissue of the most famous two books of Toccate (1615 and 1627), with the addiction in the first book of ‘le cento partite sopra Passacagli’ a monument for harpsichord music. By this time Frescobaldi must have started working on his posthumous play, eleven songs for keyboard (1645), remained uncompleted and published after his death from Alessandro Vincenti. The Flowers are the only composition by Frescobaldi explicitly conceived for pipe‐organ and the only one that present pieces strictly bounded to his function of liturgical organist. This is clearly the occasion for Frescobaldi to compose the most inspired composition of his career and so to raise the Flowers to the level of most paradigmatic composition on European scale.

Additional info about this CD
Recorded in Novalesa, Abbadia Alpina, Corio, Italy, 2011
40 pages full colour booklet (Ita, Eng, Fr)
Musicology comment
Artist biography
Full organ specs card included

Luca Guglielmi. Cinquecentina d’organo

Artist
Luca Guglielmi, organ
Composers
Pierre Attaignant (1494-1551/52) 
Girolamo Cavazzoni (ca.1525-1577) 
Heinrich Isaac (1450/55-1517) 
Paul Hofhaimer (1459-1537) 
Giulio Segni (1495-1561)
Andrea Antico (ca.1480-1538)
Janz Lublina (sec XVI)
John Redford (sec.XVI) 
Thomas Tallis (ca.1505-1585) 
Jacopo Fogliano (1468-1548) 
Antonio De Cabezòn (1510-1566)
Luìs Venegas de Henestrosa (1510-1570) 
Francisco De la Torre (1483-1504) 
Girolamo Parabosco (ca.1524-1557) 
Andrea Gabrieli (1532/33-1585)
Organ
C. Catarinozzi (1695?)
Venue
Chiesa abbaziale dei Santi Pietro e Andrea,
Novalesa, Turin - Italy

Information Album

The beginning of 16th century is one of the most flourishing moment for arts and culture in European’s history. Italy peaked then with geniuses like Pico della Mirandola, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raffaello. Those were great times for organ music too, rich of innovations and ideas that reverberated for many years ahead. Gregorian chants are still the benchmark and main reference for composition, however new elements started appearing as free compositions, processing of sacred and profane pieces for vocal music. All seeds that will became favourite themes for future composers. This CD was conceived to present and compare those new tendencies on a magnificent organ built from the well known Cesare Catarinozzi (1660-1743) around 1695 for Subiaco’s Abbey and now situated in Novalesa’s Abbey (Turin), it was recently restored from Glauci Ghilardi in 2006.

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